GymKix

Carbs: Sorting Fat from Fiction

Carbs: Sorting Fat from Fiction

When the Chico Cheer All-Stars travel to UCA Nationals in Orlando, team owner Tiffany Hayes schedules team meals at restaurants such as Planet Hollywood, where her athletes eat chicken sandwiches, pasta and Caesar salads. “While all of the options might not be as nutritionally valuable as what we would choose to make at home, they are much better than having the athletes grab ice cream and churros for dinner while running around Disney World,” says Hayes.

Hayes’ strategy is a familiar one to many coaches: keep out cheap, sugary, processed carbs—essentially everything they sell at event concession stands—and let healthier foods in.

“I encourage carbohydrates in the forms of fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains,” said Hayes, who is also a registered dietitian. “I joke with the athletes because they all love carbs. I tell them it’s okay to eat carbohydrates, [but] just try to choose the healthy carbohydrates and create a good balance with protein as well.”

How can a coach tell the difference between healthy and unhealthy carbohydrates? Nutritionist Jonny Bowden says that if you can pull it out of the ground and eat it, it’s a food that contains healthy carbs (such as broccoli, spinach or bell peppers). Everything else is suspect. Once you identify healthy carbs for your athletes, here are some other tips to keep in mind:

Set an example. Team meals are teachable moments. “Whenever I eat around my athletes, I eat complete meals with a variety of nutrients,” says Tiana Beich, a Chico All-Stars coach and dietetics student. “I also bring healthy snacks to competitions and practices.”

Optimize your snack bar. Another way athletes absorb proper diet principles is at the gym snack bar. According to Stephanie Beveridge, the executive director of programs at Copperas Cove, TX-based GymKix, the snack bar at her gym sells fresh foods, cheese sticks, organic yogurt squeezers, Orgain protein shakes, Zevia all-natural diet soda, Switch sparkling juice, CLIF bars, Terra chips, Rip Slush, Sensible dried fruit, mixed nuts, all-natural applesauce, Umpqua oatmeal and natural beef jerky.

Head off the parent problem. Parents often bring cupcakes, cake and cookies—the types of processed carbs coaches don’t want kids eating—to the gym for celebrations. Hayes says her gym encourages parents to portion treats in individual servings to take home. “We no longer see large cakes and brownies being brought in before practice,” Hayes says. “Our staff focuses on the birthday song and having an entertaining practice more than the food associated with the event.”

Read the labels. Beveridge encourages athletes to read labels. Since many labels can be confusing, she breaks it down in a way that’s easy to understand—basically, anything with more than five ingredients or anything not easily recognized or pronounced likely isn’t a good food option.

“We try to keep it simple,” says Beveridge. “It’s hard enough to teach stunting and tumbling, but to try to explain why medium chain triglyceride fats are good and hydrogenated oils are bad would literally make their head spin.  We tell them to try to shop on the outside aisles of the grocery store because that is where the meat, dairy and fresh foods are located.”

Say “no” to carb-loading. Should athletes alter their diets and “carb-load” (i.e. “stuff themselves with pasta”) before an event? Sports nutritionist Nancy Clark, RD, author of the Sports Nutrition Guidebook, says unless an athlete is going to physically exert himself or herself for more than 90 minutes the next day, the answer is no. Clark encourages athletes to always fuel up and refuel with a healthy carb-based diet that includes pasta, potatoes, rice, fruits and vegetables while taking a rest day before competition. The rest day gives muscles time to store carbs for competition.

 

Starting a Gym 101: Licenses, Permits & Insurance

Starting a Gym 101: Licenses, Permits & Insurance

Business experts and Gym Kix owners Carrie Harris and Stephanie Beveridge

Number six on our checklist of key steps that every business should take to start their business on the right track is to get all necessary licenses, permits and insurance. There is so much to do when opening a business that sometimes people overlook the important legal requirements. In addition to the information we are providing below, please seek help from your city’s chamber of commerce, a lawyer or other trade associations serving the cheerleading industry.

Federal Requirements

With the exception of Sole Proprietors, most business types must apply for an Employer Identification Number (EIN).

Most businesses do not require a federal license or permit.

State Requirements

Business licensing requirements vary from state to state; however, we have listed the most common types below:

Business Licenses: A state business license is the most important document required for tax purposes and conducting other basic business functions.

Occupations and Professions: State licenses are frequently required for occupations – the cheerleading profession does not have this requirement; however, if you have a daycare type facility (keeping children for over 3 hours usually) you may want to check your state requirement.

Licenses Based on Products Sold: Some state licensing requirements are based on the product sold.

Tax Registration: If the state in which you operate has a state income tax, you’ll have to register and obtain an employer identification number from your state’s Department of Revenue or Treasury Department. If you’re engaging in retail sales, you will need to obtain a sales tax license.

Trade Name Registration: If your business will only be operated in your local community, registering your company name with the state may be sufficient.

Employer Registrations: If you have any employees, you’ll probably be required to make unemployment insurance contributions.

-Carrie Harris & Stephanie Beveridge

 

Past posts:

Starting a Gym 101: All Things Legal

Starting a Gym 101: Making the Big Decisions

Starting a Gym 101: Writing a Business Plan

Starting a Gym 101: Legal Forms of Business Ownership

Starting a Gym 101 

 

 

Starting a Gym 101: All Things Legal

Starting a Gym 101: All Things Legal

Business experts and Gym Kix owners Carrie Harris and Stephanie Beveridge

Number five on our checklist of key steps that every business should take to start their business out on the right track is the Legal Requirements for Starting a Business.

To operate a business legally an organization needs to meet all the laws of the federal government, state government and the city and/or county where the business operates. 

Most businesses are going to need an Employer Identification Number even if they don’t have employees. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) provides clearly written documentation of what is required in terms of reporting. Other agencies may also have legal requirements. If you have employees, you will also have labor laws that you will need to follow. The Small Business Administration operates local offices in every state. These offices can be a great source of information about other local regulations you may need to be following.

There are laws and regulations governing the actual registration of the business and the business name, and there may also be licenses and permits needed to operate certain types of businesses. For instance, if you offer childcare at your gym, you may need to have special permits from social service or educational agencies. You can find out more about such regulations from your state business resource offices.

Helpful websites:

www.sba.gov

http://www.irs.gov/Businesses

-Carrie Harris & Stephanie Beveridge

 

Past posts:

Starting a Gym 101: Making the Big Decisions

Starting a Gym 101: Writing a Business Plan

Starting a Gym 101: Legal Forms of Business Ownership

Starting a Gym 101

 

 

 

Starting a Gym 101: Making the Big Decisions

Starting a Gym 101: Making the Big Decisions

Business experts and Gym Kix owners Carrie Harris and Stephanie Beveridge

One of the most overlooked aspects of business is the relationships you create. During our 13 years of business, we cannot count the number of times that we have been grateful for the friends and professional relationships we have made and their contribution to the success of our business.

Any time you are looking at making a major decision, you should get a second opinion. This will invariably save you time and money in the long run! At a minimum, you will want to have someone you trust in finance, law and insurance.

Here are some overall tips for choosing a professional to assist you:

• Ask your accountant, lawyer, friends and fellow business owners to introduce you to the professionals whom they are familiar with. Professional conventions are a great opportunity to network with other like-minded business owners and get recommendations.

• Check with your local chamber of commerce to find out which professionals and banks are active in the community.

• Look for a complementary personality. This is very important! You need a person that you can relate to and that makes you feel comfortable. A professional should never be too busy to address your needs and concerns.

• Find out how long they have been in their current position or owned their own business.

• Tell them about your business and the form of organization so they can tell you how they can assist you.

• Ask about billing rates and payment process upfront, as well as what fines and/or penalties that professional is willing to take responsibility for if they occur (this will be based on the services they render). You should not make a decision on pricing alone, but always look carefully at the charges for services.

• If you don’t understand something, ask for clarification.

Choosing a bank:

Approach this as a long-term commitment and choose wisely. You should compare financial institutions and choose the one that will best serve your business’ needs. You will want them to be able to assist you during the different stages of your business. We would recommend looking at your local banks, as we believe supporting your community is important. However, if your local bank is not able to meet your needs, then by all means keep shopping around!

Ideally your bank should be able to help you with the cash management needs, investment products, loans and advice.

Choosing an accountant:

You will want an accountant that can assist you with: bookkeeping structure, tax planning and payroll. We recommend finding someone that has worked with businesses similar to ours. The uniqueness of our business can make it very difficult to find competent help in this area.

Taxes and payroll are two areas that you do not want to mess up! If you do not have this type of experience, we HIGHLY recommend having a professional handle it for you. We also recommend educating yourself on the basics so that you can question and double-check what is being done for you. Don’t assume that they are working to your benefit until they have proven it to you!

Choosing an insurance agent:

In these times, it is almost inevitable that something will happen that will make you thankful you have proper insurance. Whether it is a natural disaster or lawsuit, your insurance company should be able to help you keep your business afloat during the difficult times. This is one area that we definitely recommend someone that is industry-specific. There are so many aspects of our business that require a professional familiar with our needs. Your insurance will be based on the services you offer and your enrollment, so be sure to update your agent if you add a program or increase/decrease your students. We cannot stress enough that you MUST read the fine print and ensure that everything is covered. Sometimes you will need to ASK for specific coverage for natural disasters—we have seen a few businesses get shafted after the hurricanes hit because they didn’t realize they weren’t covered!

Choosing a lawyer:

Your lawyer will become one of your most important advisors. You may also need to change attorneys as your business changes, but it can be an expensive process so it is best to take your time and choose the right person the first time. We recommend interviewing at least 2 or 3 attorneys. Most will waive their fee for a short interview. Stay focused when interviewing them, and ask for references of other small businesses they have assisted. Do not ask for legal advice during this process. You may also ask if they have knowledge in our field, how they charge, how you can help reduce fees and what they feel their strengths are.

Your attorney should be able to, at a minimum, assist you with contracts, leases, securities, patents, trademarks, legal advice and litigation.

-Carrie Harris & Stephanie Beveridge

 

Past posts:

Starting a Gym 101: Writing a Business Plan

Starting a Gym 101: Legal Forms of Business Ownership

Starting a Gym 101